Calculus Resources: Best Resources To Pass Calculus


Calculus Resources And Tools - Comp Sci Central

A desperate need for Calculus Resources: When I first took Calculus, I found myself struggling within just a few weeks. I didn’t have a solid foundation of algebra and trigonometry and the initial concepts taught in class were lost on me. The first thing I did was ask the brilliant minds on the internet where I could find the best calculus resources for students. However, my search came up short.

I couldn’t seem to find a well-compiled list of the best resources and tools to learn Calculus. It was only after the course was completed that I was able to compile a list of my own. These 10 resources are the only ones you will need during your undergrad to get you through Calculus.

Calculus Resources

1. Krista King’s Courses

Krista King - Calculus Resources and Tools - Comp Sci Central

Krista King has the top-rated Calculus courses on Udemy.com. Her reviews are nearly perfect and my personal review of her courses is on par with the rest of her students. Each course comes packed with hours of instructional videos and hundreds of practice problems to apply what you’ve learned after each lesson.

One of the best things about her courses is that they range from the fundamentals such as algebra and trigonometry to the advanced topics such as calculus 1, calculus 2, Calculus 3, and even linear algebra! She has a course for every mathematics class that I need for my degree course. If you feel the need to brush up on the fundamentals like I had to, I highly recommend these.

2. Symbolab

Symbolab is an online calculator that solves derivatives, integrals, and so much more. Not only does it solve the majority of the equations you’ll find in calculus, but it also shows you the steps necessary to reach the solution, as well as a graph of said function.

Symbolab has become indispensable throughout my student career. I only wish I knew about before I began Calculus. There are other online calculators out there (I’m pretty sure I’ve tried them all) but this one is by far the best. Not only does it have the best functionality, but it also has the best front-end user experience.

Price

Free with premium option

3. 3blue1brown

3blue1brown is a Youtube channel that takes a visuals-first approach on their mathematics videos. The visuals are exceptionally stunning. They’re beautiful to watch and explain the chosen topic extremely well. The videos cover topics extending beyond calculus including neural networks, quantum mechanics, and the math of bitcoin. Not only is channel useful, but it’s contents are also interesting and relevant.

Price

Free

4. How To Ace Calculus: The Streetwise Guide

‘How To Ace Calculus’ is the best introductory book on the concepts of calculus. It was written by three math teachers who were smart enough to make their book not only educational but also very entertaining. Believe it or not, this book is funny!

The best way to excel in any class is to learn to love it. This book will help you to do just that. It’s the #1 book I recommend students read before taking calculus. Also, next to a textbook, this book is a breeze coming in at just over 200 pages. The link below brings you to Amazon.com where you can check out the contents of the book and check the current price.

5. Calculus: An Intuitive And Physical Approach

This book is my personal favorite to learn Calculus because as the title suggests, it directly applies to physics and intuitive demonstrations. It’s much heftier than ‘How To Ace Calculus’ coming in at just over 900 pages and reads a bit more like a textbook. That said, it remains interesting and engaging throughout. If you’d like to check out the table of contents or price, the link below will take you to Amazon.com.

6. Calculus: Early Transcendentals

Calculus Early Transcendentals - Calculus Resources and Tools - Comp Sci Central

‘Calculus: Early Transcendentals’ is the textbook I’m using now in Calculus 2 and what I used last semester in Calculus 1. This is the most technical of the three books on this list, as well as longest, coming in at over 1100 pages. It’s also the dryest read but teaches the material really well. I have the 8th edition because that’s what’s required for my class but there are earlier editions with mostly the same content for much cheaper. The link below will take you to the 8th edition on Amazon.com.

7. MIT: Calculus For Beginners And Artists

This in-depth online guide from MIT has a lot of great, well-organized information. Some of which can help you in Calculus class, some of which cannot. I wanted to include it because it’s a great beginner’s guide. It has interactive graphs in some of the lessons to drive home the concept. It’s definitely worth checking out.

8. Khan Academy

Khan Academy is a classic collection of math videos and deserves a spot on every list of calculus resources. They have videos on almost every math topic and Sal Khan is a fantastic teacher. Khan Academy has practice problems build right into the website, along with a ‘unit test’ at the end of every section. It also gives ‘mastery points’ as you go through each subject watching videos and passing their quizzes. It’s truly an excellent resource, especially when you consider the price.

Price

Free

9. Paul’s Online Notes

Paul’s Online Notes are a collection of online notes from Professor Paul Dawkins at Lamar University. I’ve referred to his notes on several occasions and I’ve never been disappointed. He also has the best calculus cheat sheets. Seriously, go to his website and get those cheat sheets!

Price

Free

10. Calculus.org

Calculus.org is a general calculus resource page for students and instructors. It’s pretty old and has a few broken links, but there’s still a lot of great stuff there. The main reason I wanted to include this is that if you didn’t find the resource you need here, this is the next best place to look.

Price

Free

11. Comp Sci Central (Bonus)

Comp Sci Central strives to be the #1 resource for Computer Science students. My goal is to serve up the best tips and resources to comp sci students for every course required of their degree and that includes calculus. If you thought this list was helpful, I hope you’ll check out some of our related articles.

Price

Free


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Tim Statler

Tim Statler is a Computer Science student at Governors State University and the creator of Comp Sci Central. He lives in Crete, IL with his wife, Stefanie, and their cats, Beyoncé and Monte. When he's not studying or writing for Comp Sci Central, he's probably just hanging out or making some delicious food.

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